Animal sounds on display at the Philharmonie de Paris - Ocarina Music Player
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THE POND

Animal sounds on display at the Philharmonie de Paris

22/09/22 Insights Collaborations

From now on at the “Philharmonie de Paris” you can find Ocarina! Our Player has been included in the experiential kits made available to families for different visiting paths.

Inaugurated in 2015 inside the “Parc de la Villette,” the “Philharmonie de Paris” has now become a reference point for great international musicians and all those who are passionate about music. Inside is also the Museum of Music with a collection of more than 4,000 instruments, including some rare and curious ones such as the turtle-guitar, octobass or crystal flute. Among them some have had illustrious and unforgettable owners: Django Reinhardt, Frédéric Chopin, Frank Zappa.

The museum also provides two paths, a chronological one from 1600 to the present day for Western music and a geographical one for non-European music. And of course, the visit goes by music: Ocarina with a rich repertoire of themed audio tracks inside will accompany and entertain young visitors and their family.

Furthermore, from September 2021, there has been opened the “Phiharmonie des enfants,” a 1,000-m² space designed for children in which young visitors can play, explore, listen to, and experience music. The path offers 5 thematic universes and some 30 manipulable and intuitive installations that invite children to independently discover and fearlessly experiment with sounds, sound phenomena, and instruments.

A beautiful exhibition opened a few days ago and is entitled “Musicanimale. Le Grand Bestiaire sonore.” A marvelous journey through the verses of animals recorded in the wilderness: the melodic songs of whales, the vocalizations of birds, the choral howls of wolves, the meows of cats… a total of forty species of animals unwittingly become the artists of this exhibition. Enriching the exhibition are 150 immersive works and installations that show how much the animal species have always fascinated and inspired visual and sound art and poetry. Through these recordings we can thus discover unknown worlds and keep alive a sound heritage that is unfortunately on the verge of extinction.

Humans have always been confronted with animal voices to reproduce, transcribe or transfigure them. Countless bestiaries mark the history of music, from Rameau to Saint-Saëns. Many instruments also borrow shapes and materials from animals or try to imitate their sounds, not forgetting stories that poeticize the bond between humans and animals, such as The Musicians of Bremen, or even Papageno, the famous bird-man from Mozart’s Magic Flute.

An itinerary for children from 6 years old and up has also been designed within the exhibition just to make even the youngest learn about and appreciate animals and their special music. Through interactive devices, young visitors turn into little explorers: manipulating sounds, listening to stories and animal sounds, admiring paintings and works of art, children look for links between music and sounds, discovering animal songs.

If you are planning a weekend in Paris with your children, we recommend that you do not miss this interesting and unusual musical experience. HERE you can find all the detailed information.

Animal sounds on display at the Philharmonie de Paris

From now on at the “Philharmonie de Paris” you can find Ocarina! Our Player has been included in the experiential kits made available to families for different visiting paths.

Inaugurated in 2015 inside the “Parc de la Villette,” the “Philharmonie de Paris” has now become a reference point for great international musicians and all those who are passionate about music. Inside is also the Museum of Music with a collection of more than 4,000 instruments, including some rare and curious ones such as the turtle-guitar, octobass or crystal flute. Among them some have had illustrious and unforgettable owners: Django Reinhardt, Frédéric Chopin, Frank Zappa.

The museum also provides two paths, a chronological one from 1600 to the present day for Western music and a geographical one for non-European music. And of course, the visit goes by music: Ocarina with a rich repertoire of themed audio tracks inside will accompany and entertain young visitors and their family.

Furthermore, from September 2021, there has been opened the “Phiharmonie des enfants,” a 1,000-m² space designed for children in which young visitors can play, explore, listen to, and experience music. The path offers 5 thematic universes and some 30 manipulable and intuitive installations that invite children to independently discover and fearlessly experiment with sounds, sound phenomena, and instruments.

A beautiful exhibition opened a few days ago and is entitled “Musicanimale. Le Grand Bestiaire sonore.” A marvelous journey through the verses of animals recorded in the wilderness: the melodic songs of whales, the vocalizations of birds, the choral howls of wolves, the meows of cats… a total of forty species of animals unwittingly become the artists of this exhibition. Enriching the exhibition are 150 immersive works and installations that show how much the animal species have always fascinated and inspired visual and sound art and poetry. Through these recordings we can thus discover unknown worlds and keep alive a sound heritage that is unfortunately on the verge of extinction.

Humans have always been confronted with animal voices to reproduce, transcribe or transfigure them. Countless bestiaries mark the history of music, from Rameau to Saint-Saëns. Many instruments also borrow shapes and materials from animals or try to imitate their sounds, not forgetting stories that poeticize the bond between humans and animals, such as The Musicians of Bremen, or even Papageno, the famous bird-man from Mozart’s Magic Flute.

An itinerary for children from 6 years old and up has also been designed within the exhibition just to make even the youngest learn about and appreciate animals and their special music. Through interactive devices, young visitors turn into little explorers: manipulating sounds, listening to stories and animal sounds, admiring paintings and works of art, children look for links between music and sounds, discovering animal songs.

If you are planning a weekend in Paris with your children, we recommend that you do not miss this interesting and unusual musical experience. HERE you can find all the detailed information.